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Experiments by Invited Researchers

 

INFLUENCE OF STORM SEQUENCING AND BEACH RECOVERY ON SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND BEACH RESILIENCE (RESIST).

Project acronym: H+-UPC-02-CIEM
Name of Group Leader: Jose Alsina
User-Project Title: INFLUENCE OF STORM SEQUENCING AND BEACH RECOVERY ON SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND BEACH RESILIENCE (RESIST).
Facility: CIEM
Data Storage Report: data_report_resist.pdf
Publications:

RESIST: INFLUENCE OF STORM SEQUENCING AND BEACH RECOVERY ON SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND BEACH RESILIENCE (RESIST)

Funding: Transnational Access project is funded by Hydralab + by means of EU Horizon 2020 Research and innovation Programme


Partners: Imperial College, University of Twente, LEGI, University of Queensland, University of Swansea, Università Politecnica Delle Marche, Nottingham University and Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.

SUMMARY

Research on the short-term processes of beach evolution provides a certain degree of understanding of beach erosion patterns under highly energetic conditions, and of beach recovery under low energy conditions, albeit presently with less knowledge and prediction skill during accretive conditions. However, the simplistic erosion-accretion model of high-low wave energy conditions do not provide the level of detail or accuracy needed by coastal planners to take decisions on coastal management. Beach vulnerability, understood as the shoreline damage under extreme events, also depends on storm intensity, the natural beach post-storm recovery and the interval between consecutive storms.

The sequence of storms occurrence, spacing between storms and beach recovery between storms is believed to be important to the longer-term beach profile evolution. A higher potential for coastal erosion due to storm clusters has been largely proposed, however the relative erosion potential of single storms versus storm clusters has never been put into evidence on a quantitative basis.

The RESIST transnational access research concerns the response and resilience of beaches to sequential, or cyclic, periods of storm conditions and low energy accretive conditions, corresponding respectively to periods of beach erosion and recovery. The principal research aim is to conduct a novel set of large scale beach profile evolution experiments and to perform detailed measurements of the hydrodynamics, sediment dynamics and net sediment transport across the beach profile. The goals are to obtain a better understanding of the beach recovery processes between storms and the influence of storm clustering on the beach profile evolution. Parallel aims are to enhance understanding and modelling of the sediment transport and bed evolution under different wave energy conditions and to contribute to improving predictions of the long-term and statistical nature of beach evolution under realistic wave climate scenarios.

Series of large scale experimental tests are being performed to collect and analyse data on the crossshore hydrodynamics, sediment transport and beach evolution. This set of experiments will be a unique benchmark case since such information is unavailable in this context with the required level of detail. Three different sequences of erosive and low energy wave conditions will be performed. They have been designed to study the erosion-recovery process and sequencing, and the influence of the recovery process, wave conditions and the pre-existing morphology.

A range of state of art instrumentation are deployed at the CIEM (Canal d’Investigació i Experimentació Marítima). The recently developed Acoustic Concentration and Velocity Profiler (ACVP) technology is deployed on a mobile frame and it is used to provide detailed information of sediment fluxes on the shoaling and breaking region. In the inner surf and swash zones, two conductivity based probes (CCM+) have been installed at fixed locations to obtain continuous bed
levels as well as sediment particle velocity and sediment concentration within sheet-flow conditions in highly energetic storm conditions.

It is expected that the obtained experimental data and the analysis of the data will contribute to improve the knowledge of recovery processes between storms, detailed sediment transport in the surf and swash zones and will help to improve numerical predictions of beach profile evolution induced by clusters of storms.

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